My Booklist

  • Many of these books are available to check out from the Neil Armstrong School Library.

     

     

Class Favorites

  • Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Ver

    Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad, Day

    by Judith Viorst Year Published: Challenging
    A Synopsis by Barnes and Noble...He could tell it was going to be a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. He went to sleep with gum in his mouth and woke up with gum in his hair. When he got out of bed, he tripped over his skateboard and by mistake dropped his sweater in the sink while the water was running. He could tell it was going to be a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. It was a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Nothing at all was right. Everything went wrong, right down to lima beans for supper and kissing on TV. What do you do on a day like that? Well, you may think about going to Australia. You may also be glad to find that some days are like that for other people too.

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  • Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

    Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

    by Bill Martin Year Published: Challenging

    A Synopsis from Barnes and Noble...In this lively alphabet rhyme, all the letters of the alphabet race each other up the coconut tree. Will there be enough room? Oh, no -- Chicka Chicka Boom Boom!

     

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  • Diary of a Worm

    Diary of a Worm

    by Doreen Cronin Year Published: Challenging

    A synopsis from Barnes and Noble...This is the diary . . . of a worm. Surprisingly, a worm not that different from you or me. Except he eats his homework. Oh, and his head looks a lot like his rear end. Doreen Cronin, the New York Times best-selling author of CLICK, CLACK, MOO and GIGGLE, GIGGLE, QUACK, teams up with illustrator Harry Bliss for this hysterical journal about the daily doings and the hidden world of a lovable underground dweller.

     

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  • Henry and Mudge the First Book

    Henry and Mudge the First Book

    by Cynthia Rylant Year Published: Challenging
    This is the first in a series of Henry and Mudge books. They are very popular in first grade.

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  • Stellaluna

    Stellaluna

    by Janell Cannon Year Published: Challenging
    From the Publisher... Knocked from her mother's safe embrace by an attacking owl, Stellaluna lands headfirst in a bird's nest. This adorable baby fruit bat's world is literally turned upside down when she is adopted by the occupants of the nest and adapts to their peculiar bird habits. Two pages of notes at the end of the story provide factual information about bats.

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  • The Giving Tree

    The Giving Tree

    by Shel Silverstein Year Published: Average
    Synopsis A classic book for all ages—for mothers and fathers! A moving parable about the gift of giving and the capacity to love, told throughout the life of a boy who grows to manhood and a tree that selflessly gives him her bounty through the years. All ages
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  • The Great Kapok Tree

    The Great Kapok Tree

    by Lynn Cherry Year Published: Average
    Synopsis This inspired look at what the Kapok tree means to the creatures that live in it-and what rain forests mean to the world's ecology--was at the forefront of the ecological movement ten years ago and continues to resonate profoundly with children everywhere.
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  • The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

    The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

    by Jon Scieszka Year Published: Challenging

    A review from publishers weekly...In this gaily newfangled version of a classic tale, Scieszka and Smith ( Flying Jake ) argue in favor of the villain, transforming the story of the three little pigs into a playfully suspicious, rather arch account of innocence beleaguered. Quoth the wolf: ``I don't know how this whole Big Bad Wolf thing got started, but it's all wrong.' According to his first-person testimony, the wolf went visiting the pigs in search of a neighborly cup of sugar; he implies that had the first two happened to build more durable homes and the third kept a civil tongue in his head, the wolf's helpless sneezes wouldn't have toppled them. As for his casual consumption of the pigs, the wolf defends it breezily (``It seemed like a shame to leave a perfectly good ham dinner lying there in the straw') and claims cops and reporters ``framed' him. Smith's highly imaginative watercolors eschew realism, further updating the tale, though some may find their urbane stylization and intentionally static quality mystifyingly adult. Designed with uncommon flair, this alternative fable is both fetching and glib. Ages 3-8.

     

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  • Where the Wild Things Are

    Where the Wild Things Are

    by Maurice Sendak Year Published: Average
    A review from a third grader on Barnes and Noble.com...Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak is one of my favorite books. The story is about Max Max’s room grew a forest until Max’s room became the whole world. Then Max went where the wild things where then the wild things tried to scare Max but Max didn’t get scared so Max tried to scare the wild things then things got scared so Max became king of the wild things. What I thought the cool part was Max’s room became a real forest.

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  • Charlotte's Web

    Charlotte's Web

    by E.B. White Year Published: Average
    In his classic and beloved novel, E. B. White tells the memorable story of Wilbur, a little pig who becomes famous with the help of his clever friend Charlotte and their chatty animal neighbors. As the runt of the litter, Wilbur struggles to survive from the very beginning. Fern fights her father, Mr. Arable, to raise Wilbur and nurse him to health. Fern succeeds and Wilbur moves to the Zuckerman farm, where he learns the true meaning of friendship from the wise grey spider Charlotte. When it becomes apparent that Wilbur is being well fed for a reason, Charlotte and Wilbur are determined to foil Mr. Zuckerman's plans. With the help of Charlotte and her "terrific" webs, Templeton the rat, and other colorful barnyard friends, Wilbur becomes the prizewinning pig of the County Fair and the most famous pig ever. Lessons of friendship, loyalty, and truth bind this story together and show readers that friends come in all shapes and sizes.
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  • Guess How Much I Love You

    Guess How Much I Love You

    by Sam McBratney Year Published: Easy Reading
    Fresh as a fiddlehead fern in spring, this beguiling bedtime tale features a pip of a young rabbit and his indulgent parent. Searching for words to tell his dad how much he loves him (and to put off bedtime just an eentsy bit longer), Little Nutbrown Hare comes up with one example after another ("I love you as high as I can hop!"), only to have Big Nutbrown Hare continually up the ante. Finally, on the edge of sleep, he comes up with a showstopper: "I love you right up to the moon."
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Mary Pope Osborne

  • Afternoon on the Amazon

    Afternoon on the Amazon

    by Mary Pope Osborne Year Published: Average
    Synopsis Jack and Annie travel back in time to a South American rain forest in search of the elusive magician Morgan le Fay. Will they find a new clue to her whereabouts before they are trampled by stampeding killer ants?
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  • Dinosaurs Before Dark

    by Mary Pope Osborne Year Published:
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  • Dolphins and Sharks

    Dolphins and Sharks

    by Mary Pope Osborne Year Published: Average
    Synopsis How fast can some dolphins swim? What is the biggest shark? Why do sharks attack? Find out the answers to these questions and more in this Magic Tree House Research Guide! Includes an illustrated gallery of dolphins and sharks, information on the ocean, dolphin communication, how sharks hunt for food, ocean exploration, and lots more! A Stepping Stone Book™
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  • Mummies in the Morning

    by Mary Pope Osborne Year Published:
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  • Night of the Ninjas

    by Mary Pope Osborne Year Published:
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  • Rainforest: A Nonfiction Companion to Afternoon on

    Rainforest: A Nonfiction Companion to Afternoon on the Amazon

    by Mary Pope Osborne Year Published: Average
    Synopsis What is the strangest plant in the rain forest? Which rain forest animal is the creepiest? What medicines have been discovered there? How can we save our rain forests? Find out the answers to these questions and more in Magic Tree House Research Guide: Rain Forests, Jack and Annie's very own guide to the mysteries of the rain forest. Includes information on rain forests around the world; fun facts about rain-forest bugs, birds, plants, and animals; maps and photographs; and much more!
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Non-Fiction Books

  • Dogs

    by Seymour Simon Year Published: Easy Reading
    Gr. 2-3, younger for reading aloud. There are other books about these popular pets, but most are for older children. Here, Simon writes crisply for a young audience, who will eagerly turn the pages to see the next endearing color photograph. In Dogs, he begins with overall characteristics framed in ways kids can understand: "Dogs are able to swallow much larger hunks of food than humans are able to swallow." Simon also describes dogs' senses, their intelligence, and means of communication. Descriptions of birth and growth are enhanced by a full-page picture of puppies feeding and a smaller photo of a tiny puppy held in a hand. Simon also describes different breeds, including terriers, shepherds, and toys. Cats covers most of the same topics with the same sort of photos--for example, kittens feeding. Both books use a page or two to discuss pet care and end with pictures of various breeds. Simon's always lucid prose is matched by sharp photos, most of which fill up the pages. An attractive way to introduce children to nonfiction. Ilene Cooper
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  • Panda Bears

    by Gail Gibbons Year Published: Easy Reading
    Grade 1-4-This clear, readable text explains where the giant panda may be found, its physical characteristics, habits, life cycle, and present status in the wild and in zoos. A final fact page includes dates and statistics, and mentions the two pandas on loan from China at the Washington, DC, zoo. Gibbons's art, with sketchy lines and transparent watercolor backgrounds, rather than the bolder and brighter cartoon style she often uses, amplifies the information about this "gentle giant." A solid choice. Sally Bates Goodroe, formerly at Harris County Public Library, Houston, TX
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  • Recycle!

    Recycle!

    by Gail Gibbons Year Published: Easy Reading
    Grade 2-4-- An eminently readable and well-organized offering that's filled with information. Gibbons's cartoons in primary shapes and colors graphically illustrate the contents of a landfill and how to recycle various products to cut down on the need for landfills--for which space is already in short supply. Discussing paper, plastic, glass, cans, and polystyrene, the author describes how to recycle, why it's necessary, and its benefits. The top two-thirds of each page is devoted to illustrations that perfectly complement the brief text below. The book ends with a mention of the ozone layer and the limited potential for recycling polystyrene, followed by 14 facts about garbage. The plea is to make our planet a safer and healthier place to live with a habit that is fun and easy--recycling. An excellent, functional introduction. --Carole B. Kirkpatrick, Terminal Park Elementary School, Auburn, WA
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  • The Planets

    by Gail Gibbons Year Published: Easy Reading
    Kindergarten-Grade 2-Gibbons uses brief declarative sentences to describe the sun and each planet of the solar system in succession, introducing concepts such as a day, a year, orbit, and rotation. Her paintings sometimes tread the edge of oversimplicity; in a demonstration of day and night, there is almost no contrast between the planet's light and dark sides, and though she mentions in the text that Pluto is currently closer to the sun than Neptune, their orbits do not cross in the illustrations. Still, the bright colors, simplified shapes, and spacious, uncomplicated page design make this an inviting gateway to the subject. The book closes with an introduction to astronomy, creating a natural transition to the author's Stargazers (Holiday, 1992).
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Kevin Henkes

  • Chrysanthemum

    Chrysanthemum

    by Kevin Henkes Year Published: Challenging
    From the Publisher... She was a perfect baby, and she had a perfect name. Chrysanthemum. When she was old enough to appreciate it, Chrysanthemum loved her name. And then she started school. "I'm named after my grandmother," said Victoria. "You're named after a flower." Chrysanthemum wilted. Life at school didn't improve. In fact, it got worse. Then the students were introduced to their music teacher, Mrs. Twinkle. Mrs. Delphinium Twinkle. And suddenly, Chrysanthemum blossomed....

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  • Owen

    Owen

    by Kevin Henkes Year Published: Challenging
    From The Critics.... Publisher's Weekly A worthy addition to Henkes's ( Chester's Way ; Julius, the Baby of the World ) impressive, engaging oeuvre, this animated tale takes up the case of a wee mouse's devotion to a no-longer-fuzzy blanket named Fuzzy. Imbued with Henkes's characteristically understated humor, spry text and brightly hued watercolor-and-ink pictures chronicle how Owen's next-door neighbor, Mrs. Tweezers, suggests to Owen's parents a series of ploys to separate their son--who is soon to start school--from Fuzzy. The ingenious mouse foils each attempt, until his resourceful mother stumbles upon ``an absolutely wonderful, positively perfect, especially terrific idea.'' With some snipping and sewing, she transforms the beloved blanket into a batch of very portable handkerchiefs, a stratagem that not only keeps Owen happy but manages to silence the meddling Mrs. Tweezers. Even youngsters unattached to a Fuzzy-like object will feel a kinship with the winningly wily Owen--and parents of the attached may find a useful solution to an age-old dilemma. Ages 3-up. (Sept.)

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  • Wemberly Worried

    Wemberly Worried

    by Kevin Henkes Year Published: Challenging
    From Our Editors.... Fans of Kevin Henkes's loveable mice heroines from Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse, Chrysanthemum, and Sheila Rae, the Brave, will be delighted to meet little worrywart Wemberly. Poor Wemberly worries about everything: What if the tree in the front yard falls on her house? What if no one comes to her birthday party? Or worse: what if too many mice come and there isn't enough cake? Now, her newest worry is her biggest one yet: the first day of nursery school. But when she meets another mouse who is just like her, she has one less worry: Now she has a friend -- and school is fun. A fresh, funny, heartwarming book, Wemberly Worried offers a reassuring look at starting school, making friends, and growing up.

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Mem Fox

  • Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge

    Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge

    by Mem Fox Year Published: Challenging
    From The Critics... School Library Journal Gr 1-3 A small boy, Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge, knows and likes all of the old folks in the home next door, but his favorite is Miss Nancy Alison Delacourt Cooper she has four names, too. Hearing that she has lost her memory, he asks the old folks what a memory is (``Something from long ago' ; ``Something that makes you laugh;' ``Something warm;' etc.), ponders the answers, then gathers up memories of his own (seashells collected long ago last summer, a feathered puppet with a goofy expression, a warm egg fresh from the hen) to give her. In handling Wilfrid's memories, Nancy finds and shares her own. The illustrationssplashy, slightly hazy watercolors in rosy pastelscontrast the boy's fidgety energy with his friends' slow, careful movements and capture the story's warmth and sentiment. John Peters, New York Public Library

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Eric Carle

  • The Grouchy Ladybug

    The Grouchy Ladybug

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Challenging
    From The Critics Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot The grouchy ladybug is making her board book debut. She is an unpleasant personality who won't share, is belligerent, and doesn't know how to say please or thank you. The story begins very early in the morning with two lady bugs arriving to feast on a bunch of aphids covering a leaf. The grouchy ladybug won't share and she heads off to pick on someone bigger to fight. She travels for twenty-four hours and ends up right back where she started and somewhat more contrite. In this amusing story, there are lessons about the passage of time, relative sizes, and the importance of manners and good humor. Clocks appear in the upper corners showing the passage of time and the board book pages increase in size as do the creatures the ladybug challenges. It is all delivered in a nondidactic manner through Carle's beautiful collages. 1999 (orig.

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  • The Mixed Up Chameleon

    The Mixed Up Chameleon

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Average
    A synopsis from Barnes and Noble...The chameleon's life was not very exciting until the day it discovered it could change not only its color but its shape and size,too. When it saw the wonderful animals in the zoo, it immediately wanted to be like them -- and ended up likeall of them at once -- with hilarious results.

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  • The Tiny Seed

    The Tiny Seed

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Challenging

    From the Publisher Dazzlingly colorful collage illustrations and a simple but dramatic text tell the fascinating story of the life cycle of a flower in terms of the adventures of a tiny seed. Carried aloft by the autumn wind, the tiny seed, along with other bigger seeds, travels far over the world. the journey is perilous: one of the bigger seeds is burned by the sun; another falls into the ocean; still another is eaten by a bird. Even after those that are left have landed on fertile ground and begun to grow, danger is near: one small plant is stepped on; one little flower is picked; but the tiny seed keeps growing almost unnoticed. Young readers will cheer at the happy outcome of this exciting tale. And they will long remember the heartening message of the tiny seed's steadfast perseverance in the face of many hazards and obstacles until its final joyful success.

     

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  • The Very Busy Spider

    The Very Busy Spider

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Average
    From the Publishers... The farm animals try to divert a busy little spider from spinning her web, but she persists and produces a thing of both beauty and usefulness. The pictures

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  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Average
    From The Critics... Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot One Sunday a very hungry caterpillar hatched. He eats his way through a variety of foods that are boldly and colorfully illustrated. The story progresses with the caterpillar spinning a cocoon and waking up into a butterfly, illustrating one of nature's common but lovely marvels.

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  • The Very Quiet Cricket

    The Very Quiet Cricket

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Average
    A synopsis from Barnes and Noble...A very quiet cricket who wants to rub his wings together and make a sound as do so many other animals finally achieves his wish. The cricket's sound is reproduced at the end of the book.

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Ann Morris

  • Bread, Bread, Bread

    by Ann Morris Year Published: Easy Reading
    Mmm! What kind of bread do you like to eat? Here are breads from many different countries.
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  • Hats, Hats, Hats

    by Ann Morris Year Published: Easy Reading
    See photos of hats worn around the globe. Guess which country each hat comes from.
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  • On the Go

    On the Go

    by Ann Morris Year Published: Easy Reading
    Look at transportation methods around the world.
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  • Shoes, Shoes, Shoes

    Shoes, Shoes, Shoes

    by Ann Morris Year Published: Easy Reading
    Let's get this book! Ann Morris must be globe-trotting again to look at shoes on every continent.
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Patricia MacLachlan

  • Caleb's Story

    Caleb's Story

    by Patricia Maclachlan Year Published: Average
    Synopsis Anna has done something terrible. She has given me her journal to fill. In Anna's journal the words walk across the page like bird prints in the mud. But it is hard for me. It is hard for me to find things wo write about. "It's your job now," Anna says to Caleb as she hands him her journals. He worries that he'll have nothing to write about, until one winter day his younger sister, Cassie, discovers a mysterious old man in the barn and everything changes. Everyone is excited about the arrival of a new family member except for Jacob, who holds a bitter grudge. Only the special love of Caleb, and the gift he offers his grandfather, can help to mend the pain of the past. The Newbery Medal-winning Sarah, Plain and Tall began the Witting family's saga as Sarah came to the prairie as a mail-order bride to live with Jacob, Anna, and Caleb. In Skylark Sarah learned to adopt the prairie as her home and the family as her own. Caleb's Story continues in Patricia MacLachlan's signature style, spinning a tale of love, forgiveness, and the ties that bind a family together.
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  • Skylark

    Skylark

    by Patricia MacLachlan Year Published: Average
    Synopsis Sarah came to the prairie from Maine to marry Papa. But that summer, a drought turned the land dry and brown. Fires swept across the fields and coyotes came to the well in search of water. So Sarah took Anna and Caleb back east, where they would be safe. Papa stayed behind. He would not leave his land. Maine was beautiful, but Anna missed home, and Papa. And as the weeks went by, she began to wonder what would happen if the rains never came. Would she and Caleb and Sarah and Papa ever be a family again?
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  • Sarah, Plain and Tall

    Sarah, Plain and Tall

    by Patricia Maclachlan Year Published: Average
    In the late 19th century a widowed midwestern farmer with two children--Anna and Caleb--advertises for a wife. When Sarah arrives she is homesick for Maine, especially for the ocean which she misses greatly. The children fear that she will not stay, and when she goes off to town alone, young Caleb--whose mother died during childbirth--is stricken with the fear that she has gone for good. But she returns with colored pencils to illustrate for them the beauty of Maine, and to explain that, though she misses her home, "the truth of it is I would miss you more." The tale gently explores themes of abandonment, loss and love.
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Jan Brett

  • Hedgie's Surprise

    Hedgie's Surprise

    by Jan Brett Year Published: Average
    A synopsis from Barnes and Noble...Jan Brett's beloved character Hedgie stars in this charming story about a little Tomten who gets tired of porridge for breakfast and starts stealing Henny's eggs. But Henny wants a brood of chicks and she needs her eggs. With the help of clever Hedgie, she substitutes an acorn, a strawberry, a mushroom and finally a potato in her nest. But nothing stops that Tomten until the little hedgehog hides in Henny's nest: when the Tomten reaches in to get his morning treat, all he gets is a handful of prickles. He runs home for porridge and never comes back again!

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  • The Mitten

    The Mitten

    by Jan Brett Year Published: Challenging
    From The Critics..... Publisher's Weekly Baba, Nicki's grandmother, knits pure white mittens for him, even though she is afraid that he will lose them in the snow. Sure enough, the first time Nicki is out, he drops one and some animals promptly move into its snug wool interior. First comes a mole, then a rabbit, a hedgehog, an owl, a badger, a fox, a bear and, finally, a mouse. That mouse tickles the bear's nose and he sneezes, dislodging all of the animals at once. Nicki finds his mitten, and takes it home, but Baba is left to wonder about how it became so enormously stretched out. Brett's magnificent paintings feature her usual array of folk details, and this time, intricate knitting tracks, ornate embroidery, the crusty, peeling texture of the birch bark borders and the exquisite patterns found in Baba's homey rooms. Readers will sit back, suspend belief and welcome this tall tale from the Ukrainian tradition. Ages 4-8. (Sept.)

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  • The Three Snow Bears

    The Three Snow Bears

    by Jan Brett Year Published: Average
    A synopsis from Barnes and Noble...Aloo-ki glances up from fishing and sees her sled dogs floating off on an ice floe. She races after them and comes upon an igloo. Being a curious girl, she goes inside only to find no one home. That's because the polar bear family who lives there is out walking while their breakfast cools off. Aloo-ki eats some soup, tries on their boots, and finally crawls into the smallest bed for a nap. Meanwhile, Papa, Mama, and Baby Bear see her dogs adrift, swim out to rescue them and return home to find Aloo-ki fast asleep in Baby Bear's bed.

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September Books

  • First Day Jitters

    by Julie Danneberg Year Published:
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  • Miss Nelson is Missing

    Miss Nelson is Missing

    by Harry Allard Year Published: Challenging

    A summary by a third grade reviewer on Barnes and Noble.com...Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard is a great book. In room 29 kids were being bad and went listing to the teacher and went behaving then the next day Miss Nelson was gone. All of unsung an ugly woman came through the door and the kids were worried about Miss Nelson and the rest you have to read. My favorite part was the ending. But if you want to find out my favorite part of the storey you have to read the book to find my favorite part.

     

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Judy Blume

  • Freckle Juice

    Freckle Juice

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Challenging
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  • Fudge-a-Mania

    Fudge-a-Mania

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Challenging
    Grade 2-5-- The Tubmans and the Hatchers return in this latest chronicle of the hilarious escapades of Fudge, Pete, and Tootsie Hatcher and Sheila "Queen of Cooties" Tubman. Their parents decide to spend their summer vacation in the woods of Maine right next door to each other--but "next door" turns out to be in the same house. Fast-paced mayhem becomes the order of the day as children, adults (including Grandma Hatcher and Grandpa Tubman), and assorted pets find themselves in daily (hourly?) predicaments. Not to be outdone in the madcap pace, Grandma and Grandpa announce their intention to be married. The story concludes with the solemn pact between Pete and Sheila that even though they'll be related, they will always hate each other. The story is filled with humor, and the upbeat mood is sustained at a hectic pace from first page to last. The uncomplicated plot is developed smoothly with just the right doses of surprise and laughter to keep readers turning the pages. Characters are credible, and never lose their identities. Be forewarned--fun between the covers of the bright red dust jacket means multiple copies for purchase. --Mary Lou Budd, Milford South Elementary School, OH
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  • The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo

    The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Easy Reading
    The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo was a very good, funny book. It showed us that every kid in the family is special - oldest, youngest and yes, even the kid in the middle. We were glad that Freddy went from sad to happy and that he was the best green kangaroo in the play. We would recommend this book for first grade to fourth grade.
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  • The Pain and the Great One

    The Pain and the Great One

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Easy Reading
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  • Double Fudge

    Double Fudge

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Challenging
    Fans of Superfudge and Fudge-a-Mania will welcome the return of seventh-grader Peter Hatcher and his five-year-old brother, Fudge, who in this comical caper meet distant cousins from Hawaii. The two families unexpectedly encounter one another in Washington, D.C., where the New York City Hatchers have gone so that Fudge, who has developed an obsession with money, can visit the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The Howie Hatcher clan proves an eccentric lot. Twins Fauna and Flora, unironicially nicknamed the Natural Beauties, would be in Peter's grade if they weren't home-schooled; apt to break into corny songs at any moment, they perform together as the Heavenly Hatchers. Their younger brother, who shares Fudge's real name (Farley Drexel), acts like a dog, growling and licking people. And their father won't stop calling Peter's dad "Tubby." Narrator Peter grits his teeth when the Honolulu Hatchers invite themselves to Manhattan to stay in his family's cramped apartment, where nestled in their sleeping bags on the living room floor they "slept flat on their backs, like a row of hot dogs in their rolls. All that was missing was the mustard and the relish." The boy is further appalled when the twins show up at his school and convene an assembly so that they can sing. Peter's wry reactions to the sometimes outsize goings-on, Fudge's inimitable antics and the characters' rousing repartee contribute to the sprightly clip of this cheerful read.
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Cynthia Rylant

  • Gooseberry Park

    Gooseberry Park

    by Cynthia Rylant Year Published: Average
    An assortment of domesticated pets and untamed creatures band together to help a friend in need in the Newbery Medalist's rollicking animal tale. At the center is Stumpy, a squirrel who gives birth to triplets shortly before her nest in Gooseberry Park is destroyed by an ice storm. Thanks to the ingenuity of Gwendolyn, a Labrador owned by a retired professor; Kona, a wise old hermit crab; and a prankster bat named Murray, Stumpy's babies are rescued and taken to cozy quarters in the professor's basement. The problem? Having left the newborns under the care of Murray, Stumpy has wandered off for help and cannot be found. The adventures of Gwendolyn, Kona and Murray as they nurture the baby squirrels, raid the professor's cupboards and eventually devise a scheme to reunite Stumpy with her brood add up to first-rate entertainment. Readers will relish every moment of this impeccably paced fantasy and its winning depictions of the unique perspectives and quandaries of four unlikely companions. Ages 8-12.
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  • Poppleton

    Poppleton

    by Cynthia Rylant Year Published: Easy Reading
    PreSchool-Grade 2. Poppleton, a most interesting pig, lives in a charming house in the country in this three-chapter beginning reader. In the first chapter, instead of submitting indefinitely to an overly friendly neighbor's ministrations, he finally tells her, though not without first making a muddle of it, that he needs time to himself. In the second, he shows how much he values reading, for not even the temptations of a lovely afternoon tea or an exciting parade stand in the way of his Monday library day. The final story reveals Poppleton's sense of humor as he joins a sick friend in bed when it becomes clear that there is a very palatable way to take pills. With his aerial view on the endpapers, Teague ushers readers into the pig's small country town. His large, acrylic cartoons introduce many humorous touches: a chicken on rollerblades; a framed picture of Poppleton's sociable neighbor, waving, of course; a picture of a can on the wall in a goat friend's house. The characters' facial expressions and body language greatly enhance the text. Rylant titles this Book One. Readers will be happy to know there are other Poppleton adventures in the wings.?Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community-Technical College, CT
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  • Some Good News

    Some Good News

    by Cynthia Rylant Year Published: Easy Reading
    Grade 2-4Two more beginning chapter-book series titles that young girls will adore. Three nine-year-old cousinsTess, Lily, and Rosielive with their Aunt Lucy while their parents tour with a ballet company. In Some Good News, the girls create a local newspaper; in Special Gifts, they learn to sew. The simple plots rise and fall gently with enough action and activity to interest beginning readers. These are lighthearted stories with happy endings. The minutely detailed pencil-and-watercolor artwork sprinkled throughout the books reveals the unique personalities of the girls and creates a wonderfully serene setting. Readers are going to wish they, too, lived on Cobble Street.
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  • The Blue Hill Meadows

    The Blue Hill Meadows

    by Cynthia Rylant Year Published: Average
    Grade 3-5. In four short chapters, Rylant introduces the Meadows: Sullivan, Eva, and their two boys Ray and Willie. They live in Blue Hill, Virginia, where things move slowly and a family has time to "just be." As always, Rylant writes with grace. Her spare style effortlessly creates a sense of place, rich in homey, happy details. The watercolor and acrylic illustrations, done mostly in blues and lavenders, contribute to the gentle tone. Each chapter is set in a different season, creating a nice balance to the pacing and bringing the end back to the beginning. However, for all its loveliness, there is a detached quality to the narration that makes it read more like a sweet dream than a here-and-now story. Willie is the only character who ever develops a personality, which is a shame since the joy of adopting a stray pet, the excitement of a fishing trip, the worry about being stuck at a teacher's house during a blizzard, and agonizing over the perfect gift for Mom are all experiences that would appeal to children. Perhaps the biggest problem this book will face is finding an audience. It would be best appreciated by older readers, but it will be most attractive to the beginning chapter-book crowd, who may struggle with the language and pace. If this book is placed into the right hands, its readers will be treated to a lazy, gentle year with a really nice family.?Patricia A. Dollisch, DeKalb County Public Library, Decatur, GA Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of
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  • The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog

    The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog

    by Cynthia Rylant Year Published: Easy Reading
    Poor Gracie. All this little pooch wanted was a quiet house, with "the kitty sleeping on the windowsill, the big dog sleeping on the couch, the quiet fish going ploop-ploop." But then one day the painters came. In a "big, noisy truck," with "clangy ladders and big-person voices." Clearly, there was only one solution: "She barked and barked and told them to go outside. But do you know what? Gracie was put outside
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  • The Turtle

    by Cynthia Rylant Year Published: Easy Reading
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