My Booklist




  • Sometimes it is nice to have information in black and white and so I have compiled some resources that you may find helpful

Parent Resources

  • Out of Sync Child

    Out of Sync Child

    by Carol Stock Kranowitz Year Published:
    The Out-of-Sync Child broke new ground by identifying Sensory Processing Disorder, a common but frequently misdiagnosed problem in which the central nervous system misinterprets messages from the senses. This newly revised edition features additional information from recent research on vision and hearing deficits, motor skill problems, nutrition and picky eaters, ADHA, autism, and other related disorders.

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  • Reflexes, Learning and Behavior

    Reflexes, Learning and Behavior

    by Sally Goddard Year Published:
    A non-invasive approach to solving learning and behavior problems.

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  • Sensory Integration and the Child (Paperback)

    Sensory Integration and the Child (Paperback)

    by A. Jean Ayres Year Published:
    T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. Professor Emeritus, Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School This is a classic book and parents should be aware of it. Diana A. Henry, M.S., OTR/L www.ateachabout.com A must for parents, teachers, and others seeking to understand sensory integration dysfunction.

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  • Smart Moves

    Smart Moves

    by Carla Hannaford, PH.D Year Published:
    Neurophysiologist and educator Dr. Carla Hannaford brings the latest insights from scientific research to questions that affect learners of all ages. Examining the body's role in learning, from infancy through adulthood she presents the mounting scientific evidence that movement is crucial to learning.Dr. Hannaford offers clear alternatives and remedies that people can put into practice right away to make a real difference in their ability to learn.She advocates more enlightened educational practices for homes and schools including: a more holistic view of each learner; less emphasis on rote learning; more experiential, active instruction; less labeling of learning disabilities; more physical movement; more personal expression through arts, sports and music; less prescribing of Ritalin and other drugs whose long term effects are not even known.

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  • The Out-of-Sync-Child Has Fun

    The Out-of-Sync-Child Has Fun

    by Carol Stock Kranowitz Year Published:
    This companion volume to The Out-of-Sync Child presents activities that parents of kids with Sensory Integration Dysfunction can do at home with their child to strengthen their child's abilities-and have some fun together along the way.

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Teacher Resources

  • 100 Ideas for Supporting Pupils with Dyspraxia and DCD

    by Amanda Kirby Year Published:

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  • Brain Gym (Teachers Edition: Revised) (Paperback)

    Brain Gym (Teachers Edition: Revised) (Paperback)

    by Paul E. Dennison Year Published:
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  • Brain Rules

    by John Medina Year Published:
    Most of us have no idea what's really going on inside our heads. Yet brain scientists have uncovered details every business leader, parent, and teacher should know--such as the brain's need for physical activity to work at its best. How do we learn? What exactly do sleep and stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking a myth? Why is it so easy to forget--and so important to repeat new information? Is it true that men and women have different brains? In Brain Rules, molecular biologist Dr. John Medina shares his lifelong interest in how the brain sciences might influence the way we teach our children and the way we work. In each chapter, he describes a brain rule--what scientists know for sure about how our brains work--and then offers transformative ideas for our daily lives. Medina's fascinating stories and sense of humor breathe life into brain science. You'll learn why Michael Jordan was no good at baseball. You'll peer over a surgeon's shoulder as he finds, to his surprise, that we have a Jennifer Aniston neuron. You'll meet a boy who has an amazing memory for music but can't tie his own shoes. You will discover how: - Every brain is wired differently - Exercise improves cognition - We are designed to never stop learning and exploring - Memories are volatile - Sleep is powerfully linked with the ability to learn - Vision trumps all of the other senses - Stress changes the way we learn In the end, you'll understand how your brain really works--and how to get the most out of it.
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  • Edu-K For Kids

    Edu-K For Kids

    by Paul E. Dennison Year Published:
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  • Educate Your Brain

    Educate Your Brain

    by Kathy Brown Year Published: Average
    Kathy says, “My goal was to bring together all the simplified basics of the amazing Brain Gym® program, making them both understandable to the newcomer and useful to the seasoned Edu-K consultant.” This book is in three sections: •The first chapters go step-by-step through the PACE process, describing the benefits of the four Brain Gym movements that are its components. •The middle section explores diverse elements of theory and practice. •And the third section illustrates how Brain Gym can be used in a wide variety of situations throughout life. Paul Dennison, co-creator of the Brain Gym program, says: “I found it a joy to read this book.”

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  • Smart Moves: Why Learning Is Not All in Your Head

    Smart Moves: Why Learning Is Not All in Your Head (Paperback)

    by Carla Hannaford Year Published:
    Neurophysiologist and educator Dr. Carla Hannaford brings the latest insights from scientific research to questions that affect learners of all ages. Examining the body's role in learning, from infancy through adulthood she presents the mounting scientific evidence that movement is crucial to learning. Dr. Hannaford offers clear alternatives and remedies that people can put into practice right away to make a real difference in their ability to learn. She advocates more enlightened educational practices for homes and schools including: a more holistic view of each learner; less emphasis on rote learning; more experiential, active instruction; less labeling of learning disabilities; more physical movement; more personal expression through arts, sports and music; less prescribing of Ritalin and other drugs whose long term effects are not even known.
    Comments (-1)