My Booklist

  • Below you will find a suggested book list for my third grade readers and a list of teacher read alouds. This is only a guide. The amount of children's literature available is HUGE. This site will hopefully provide students and parents with a springboard to get started!

Picture Books

  • A Chair for My Mother

    A Chair for My Mother

    by Vera Williams Year Published: Easy Reading

    Annotation A child, her waitress mother, and her grandmother save dimes to buy a comfortable armchair after all their furniture is lost in a fire. From the Publisher The jar of coins is full. The day has come to buy the chair—the big, fat, comfortable, wonderful chair they have been saving for. The chair that will replace the one that was burned up—along with everything else—in the terrible fire. A book of love and tenderness filled with the affirmation of life. The jar of coins is full. The day has come to buy the chair - the big, fat, comfortable, wonderful chair they have been saving for. The chair that will replace the one that was burned up - along with everything else - in the terrible fire. A book of love and tenderness filled with the affirmation of life. Author Biography: Vera B. Williams lives in New York City.

     

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  • Amelia's Notebook

    Amelia's Notebook

    by Marissa Moss Year Published: Average
    Annotation The hand-lettered contents of a nine-year-old girl's notebook, in which she records her thoughts and feelings about moving, starting school, and dealing with her older sister, as well as keeping her old best friend and making a new one. From the Publisher Meet Amelia! In her first journal, nine-year-old Amelia shares her thoughts on moving and getting used to a new home and school. 32 pages From The Critics Publisher's Weekly Moss (Mel's Diner) designs this upbeat, first-person story to resemble a real diary; the cover bears the familiar black-and-white abstract design of a composition book, decorated with color cartoons by Amelia, the book's nine-year-old ``author.'' Inside, on lined pages, Amelia writes about her recent move to a new town, doodles pictures of people she meets and saves such mementos as postage stamps and a birthday candle. She misses her best friend, Nadia, but her moments of sadness are balanced by optimism-she distracts herself by drawing and by writing short stories. In appropriately conversational terms, Amelia complains that her big sister invades her privacy (``So Cleo if you are reading this right now-BUG OFF and STAY OUT''); gripes about cafeteria food (``Henna says they use dog food. I believe it!''); and jokes in classic elementary-school gross-out fashion. Readers will understand Amelia's wish to put her ``top secret'' thoughts on paper, and they'll notice that even though she's uneasy about attending a different school, she's starting over successfully. An on-target presentation. Ages 7-up. (Mar.)

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Read Aloud

  • A Bad Case of Stripes

    by David Shannon Year Published:

    On this disturbing book's striking dust jacket, a miserable Betty-Boop-like girl, completely covered with bright bands of color, lies in bed with a thermometer dangling from her mouth. The rainbow-hued victim is Camilla Cream, sent home from school after some startling transformations: "when her class said the Pledge of Allegiance, she turned red, white, and blue, and she broke out in stars!" Scientists and healers cannot help her, for after visits from "an old medicine man, a guru, and even a veterinarian... she sprouted roots and berries and crystals and feathers and a long furry tail." The paintings are technically superb but viscerally troubling?especially this image of her sitting in front of the TV with twigs and spots and fur protruding from her. The doe-eyed girl changes her stripes at anyone's command, and only nonconformity can save her. When she finally admits her unspeakable secret?she loves lima beans?she is cured. Shannon (How Georgie Radbourn Saved Baseball) juggles dark humor and an anti-peer-pressure message. As her condition worsens, Camilla becomes monstrous, ultimately merging with the walls of her room. The hallucinatory images are eye-popping but oppressive, and the finale?with Camilla restored to her bean-eating self?brings a sigh of relief. However, the grotesque images of an ill Camilla may continue to haunt children long after the cover is closed. Ages 5-9.

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  • Bunnicula

    Bunnicula

    by Deborah & James Howe Year Published: Average
    It all starts when Harold's human family, the Monroes, goes to see the movie Dracula, and young Toby accidentally sits on a baby rabbit wrapped in a bundle on his seat. How could the family help but take the rabbit home and name it Bunnicula? Chester, the literate, sensitive, and keenly observant family cat, soon decides there is something weird about this rabbit. Pointy fangs, the appearance of a cape, black-and-white coloring, nocturnal habits … it sure seemed like he was a vampire bunny. When the family finds a white tomato in the kitchen, sucked dry and colorless, well … Chester becomes distraught and fears for the safety of the family. "Today, vegetables. Tomorrow … the world!" he warns Harold. But when Chester tries to make his fears known to the Monroes, he is completely misunderstood, and the results are truly hilarious. Is Bunnicula really a vampire bunny? We can't say. But any child who has ever let his or her imagination run a little wild will love Deborah and James Howe's funny, fast-paced "rabbit-tale of mystery."
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  • Charlotte's Web

    Charlotte's Web

    by E. B. White Year Published: Average
    An affectionate, sometimes bashful pig named Wilbur befriends a spider named Charlotte, who lives in the rafters above his pen. A prancing, playful bloke, Wilbur is devastated when he learns of the destiny that befalls all those of porcine persuasion. Determined to save her friend, Charlotte spins a web that reads "Some Pig," convincing the farmer and surrounding community that Wilbur is no ordinary animal and should be saved. In this story of friendship, hardship, and the passing on into time, E.B. White reminds us to open our eyes to the wonder and miracle often found in the simplest of things.
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  • Martin's Big Words

    Martin's Big Words

    by Doreen Rappaport Year Published: Average
    In this elegant pictorial biography of Martin Luther King Jr., author Doreen Rappaport combines her spare, lyrical text with King's own words for an effective, age-appropriate portrayal of one of the world's greatest civil rights leaders.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Sideways Stories from Wayside School

    Sideways Stories from Wayside School

    by Louis Sachar Year Published: Average
    There was a terrible mistake-Wayside School was built with one classroom on top of another, thirty stories high! (The builder said he was sorry.) Maybe that's why all kinds of funny things happened at Wayside-especially on the thirteenth floor.
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Picture Books

  • Elmer

    by David McKee Year Published:
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  • Martin's Big Words

    by Doreen Rappaport Year Published: Average
    In this elegant pictorial biography of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., author Doreen Rappaport combines her spare, lyrical text with King's own words for an effective, age-appropriate portrayal of one of the world's greatest civil rights leaders.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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Series Books

Beginning to Read Books

  • Biscuit

    Biscuit

    by Alyssa Satin Capucilli Year Published: Easy Reading
    Get ready for five great stories about an adorable puppy. Meet this favorite character for the first time in Biscuit. -As the puppy gets ready for bed, he thinks its time to play. Will Biscuit fall asleep? -When Biscuit meets a lost duckling he helps the little duck find its way home. Then their fun begins! -Everything is ready for the puppy's bath. But Biscuit would rather roll in the mud and play with his friend! Will Biscuit ever get clean? -When it's time for Biscuit to learn to fetch he'd rather chase the cat. Woof! -When two little kittens get in trouble it's Biscuit to the rescue! A child will turn to Biscuit's adventures again and again with pleasure, happy to be able to say, "I can read!"
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  • Frog and Toad Are Friends

    Frog and Toad Are Friends

    by Arnold Lobel Year Published: Easy Reading
    From the Publisher Frog runs to Toad's house. "Toad, Toad," he shouts, "wake up! It is spring!" It is time for Frog and Toad to begin a whole new year together as best friends. From their search for Toad's lost button to a summertime swimming adventure, they are always there for each other. This Caldecott Honor Book continues to charm children more than three decades after its original publication. A time-honored tale of friendship that is perfect for reading together.
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  • Mouse Tales

    Mouse Tales

    by Arnold Lobel Year Published: Easy Reading
    The implicit dangers of the cold and unknown world outside are offset by the comforting presence of Papa Mouse in his bathrobe, polka-dotted pajamas, and bedroom slippers. Papa Mouse models loving behavior in the way he relates to his wife and children: He sees his children off to sleep and then joins his wife for a nice cup of tea before the fire. The stories provide an excellent transition from the read-aloud stage to reading alone, giving this collection what one parent calls "a long shelf life." Parents will love reading these stories (and, later on, listening as their children read them) again and again.
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Favorite Fiction

Fantasy

  • The Mystery of Edward Tulane

    by Kate DiCamillo Year Published: Average

    From the Publisher Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a china rabbit named Edward Tulane. The rabbit was very pleased with himself, and for good reason: he was owned by a girl named Abilene, who treated him with the utmost care and adored him completely. And then, one day, he was lost. Kate DiCamillo takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the depths of the ocean to the net of a fisherman, from the top of a garbage heap to the fireside of a hobo's camp, from the bedside of an ailing child to the streets of Memphis. And along the way, we are shown a true miracle -- that even a heart of the most breakable kind can learn to love, to lose, and to love again.

     

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Poetry

  • A Light in the Attic

    A Light in the Attic

    by Shel Silverstein Year Published: Average
    Shel Silversteins poems are sometimes silly, sometimes wonderful. These are great poems to read with a child.
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  • Forest Has a Song

    by Amy Ludwig Vanderwater Year Published:
    Amy Ludwig Vanderwater's poems have been published in several anthologies. This is her first book and it's fabulous. A tribute to the beauties and wonders of nature celebrated with beautiful language. A must have!!
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  • Pizza the Size of the Sun

    Pizza the Size of the Sun

    by Jack Prelutsky Year Published: Average
    Pizza the Size of the Sun Annotation A collection of humorous poetry on a variety of topics. From the Publisher Jack Prelutsky is widely acknowledged as the poet laureate of the younger generation. (And many people would happily see him crowned with no age qualification.) The New Kid on the Block and Something Big Has Been Here are household words wherever there are kids. Here is another wondrously rich, varied, clever - and always funny - collection. Meet Miss Misinformation, Swami Gourami, and Gladiola Gloppe (and her Soup Shoppe), and delight in a backwards poem, a poem that ever ends, and scores of others that will be changed, read, and loved by readers of every age. The Prelutsky-Stevenson duo is irresistible. Whether you begin at the beginning or just open the book at random, you won't stop smiling.

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  • Where the Sidewalk Ends

    Where the Sidewalk Ends

    by Shel Silverstein Year Published:
    Stanley the Fierce and the entire cast of Silverstein characters are a great way for children to learn about poetry, whether on their own or with a parent or grandparent.
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Favorite Authors

Judy Blume

  • Double Fudge

    Double Fudge

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Average
    From the Publisher
    "I love money," is five-year-old Fudge's new theme song. He's going to dress as a miser for Halloween and has made big plans to buy the entire world (or at least Toys"R"Us). Fudge's new obsession with cash is driving his older brother Peter crazy! But life really spins out of control when Peter and his family run into their long-lost relatives, the Howie Hatchers of Honolulu, Hawaii. Now Peter has to deal with Flora and Fauna, his annoying twin cousins who burst into song at the drop of a hat, and their weird little brother, coincidentally named Farley Drexel Hatcher-just like Fudge! Their names aren't the only similarity, and before long, mini-Fudge is causing just as much trouble as Fudge always has! This newest book starring Peter and Fudge is one wild ride!

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  • Fudge-a-mania

    Fudge-a-mania

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Average
    From the Publisher
    Peter Hatcher can't get a break. His little brother, Fudge -- the five-year-old human hurricane -- has big plans to marry Peter's sworn enemy, Sheila Tubman. That alone would be enough to ruin Peter's summer, but now his parents have decided to rent a summer home next door to Sheila the Cootie Queen's house. Peter will be trapped with Fudge and Sheila for three whole weeks!

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  • Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great

    Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Average
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  • Superfudge

    Superfudge

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Average
    From the Publisher
    Twelve-year-old Peter can hardly survive life in the Hatcher household. Fudge is still hisbiggest problem, but now he has a whole new disaster to consider. Will the new Hatcher baby become a carbon copy of the zany Fudge?

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  • Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing

    by Judy Blume Year Published: Average
    From the Publisher:
    Living with his little brother, Fudge, makes Peter Hatcher feel like a fourth grade nothing. Whether Fudge is throwing a temper tantrum in a shoe store, smearing smashed potatoes on walls at Hamburger Heaven, or scribbling all over Peter's homework, he's never far from trouble. He's a two-year-old terror who gets away with everything and Peter's had enough. When Fudge walks off with Dribble, Peter's pet turtle, it's the last straw. Peter has put up with Fudge too long. How can he get his parents to pay attention to him for a change?

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Andrew Clements