My Booklist

  • The book list provided below is a good resource for what kinds of books I use in the classroom. I often teach art through the lens of children's books and illustration. This list is only a small snippet of the books we use in class, but feel free explore some titles!

Frequently Used Books!

  • Beautiful Oops! 2010

    by Barney Saltzberg Year Published: Easy Reading
    A life lesson that all parents want their children to learn: It’s OK to make a mistake. In fact, hooray for mistakes! A mistake is an adventure in creativity, a portal of discovery. A spill doesn’t ruin a drawing—not when it becomes the shape of a goofy animal. And an accidental tear in your paper? Don’t be upset about it when you can turn it into the roaring mouth of an alligator. An award winning, best-selling, one-of-a-kind interactive book, Beautiful Oops! shows young readers how every mistake is an opportunity to make something beautiful. A singular work of imagination, creativity, and paper engineering, Beautiful Oops! is filled with pop-ups, lift-the-flaps, tears, holes, overlays, bends, smudges, and even an accordion “telescope”—each demonstrating the magical transformation from blunder to wonder.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Do You Want to Be My Friend?, 1971

    Do You Want to Be My Friend?, 1971

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    In few words but expressive pictures, a little mouse looks for a friend - and happily finds one just in time to save himself from a predator who has been hiding there all the time - unseen, but in plain sight! A simple story on the universal theme of friendship.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • FRIENDS, 2013

    FRIENDS, 2013

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    When a best friend moves away, it can be painful for the child who is left behind. But the spunky boy in this upbeat story makes up his mind to find his missing playmate. Young readers will cheer on the boy as he braves currents, climbs mountains, and dashes through rain before, finally, reuniting with his friend. A story alive with love and perseverance, brightened with vibrant art and Eric Carle's trademark fostering of imagination.

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  • Going Places, 2014

    Going Places, 2014

    by Peter H. Reynolds Year Published: Average
    A go-cart contest inspires imagination to take flight in this picture book for creators of all ages, with art from New York Times bestselling illustrator Peter H. Reynolds. It’s time for this year’s Going Places contest! Finally. Time to build a go-cart, race it—and win. Each kid grabs an identical kit, and scrambles to build. Everyone but Maya. She sure doesn’t seem to be in a hurry...and that sure doesn’t look like anybody else’s go-cart! But who said it had to be a go-cart? And who said there’s only one way to cross the finish line? This sublime celebration of creative spirit and thinking outside the box—both figuratively and literally—is ideal for early learners, recent grads, and everyone in between.

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  • Hello, Red Fox, 1998

    Hello, Red Fox, 1998

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Average
    Mama Frog gets a big surprise when the guests arrive for Little Frog’s birthday party: Red Fox looks green to her! Orange Cat looks blue! With the active help of the reader, Little Frog shows Mama Frog how to see the animals in their more familiar colors. In this book, Eric Carle invites readers to discover complementary colors while enjoying the amusing story of Little Frog and his colorful friends.

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  • Ish, 2004

    Ish, 2004

    by Peter H. Reynolds Year Published: Average
    Ramon loved to draw. Anytime. Anything. Anywhere. Drawing is what Ramon does. It¹s what makes him happy. But in one split second, all that changes. A single reckless remark by Ramon's older brother, Leon, turns Ramon's carefree sketches into joyless struggles. Luckily for Ramon, though, his little sister, Marisol, sees the world differently. She opens his eyes to something a lot more valuable than getting things just "right." Combining the spareness of fable with the potency of parable, Peter Reynolds shines a bright beam of light on the need to kindle and tend our creative flames with care.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Little Cloud, 1996

    Little Cloud, 1996

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    Every child loves to see fanciful shapes in the clouds. But what are clouds really for? Here a little cloud slips away from its parent clouds and turns itself into a series of wonderful forms - a sheep, an airplane, a hat, a clown - before rejoining the other clouds as they perform their real function: making rain.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Not A Box, 2006

    Not A Box, 2006

    by Antoinette Portis Year Published: Easy Reading
    A box is just a box . . . unless it's not a box. From mountain to rocket ship, a small rabbit shows that a box will go as far as the imagination allows. Inspired by a memory of sitting in a box on her driveway with her sister, Antoinette Portis captures the thrill when pretend feels so real that it actually becomes real—when the imagination takes over and inside a cardboard box, a child is transported to a world where anything is possible.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Perfect Square, 2011

    Perfect Square, 2011

    by Michael Hall Year Published: Average
    A perfect square is transformed in this adventure story that will transport you far beyond the four equal sides of this square book.
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  • Red: A Crayon's Story, 2015

    Red: A Crayon's Story, 2015

    by Michael Hall Year Published: Average
    Red has a bright red label, but he is, in fact, blue. His teacher tries to help him be red (let's draw strawberries!), his mother tries to help him be red by sending him out on a playdate with a yellow classmate (go draw a nice orange!), and the scissors try to help him be red by snipping his label so that he has room to breathe. But Red is miserable. He just can't be red, no matter how hard he tries! Finally, a brand-new friend offers a brand-new perspective, and Red discovers what readers have known all along. He's blue! This funny, heartwarming, colorful picture book about finding the courage to be true to your inner self can be read on multiple levels, and it offers something for everyone.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Sky Color, 2012

    Sky Color, 2012

    by Peter H. Reynolds Year Published: Average
    Marisol loves to paint. So when her teacher asks her to help make a mural for the school library, she can’t wait to begin! But how can Marisol make a sky without blue paint? After gazing out the bus window and watching from her porch as day turns into night, she closes her eyes and starts to dream. . . . From the award-winning Peter H. Reynolds comes a gentle, playful reminder that if we keep our hearts open and look beyond the expected, creative inspiration will come.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Art of Eric Carle, 1996

    The Art of Eric Carle, 1996

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Average

    This handsomely-designed volume explores many facets of Eric Carle’s life and work. It includes an autobiography, illustrated with many photographs, telling of his early years in the United States, describing the roots of his inspiration, his art education in Germany, his career as a commercial artist on his return to the land of his birth, and his almost accidental discovery of his real vocation—creating beautiful picturebooks for young children. Essays and critical appreciations of his works, and color photographs showing how the artist creates his unique collage illustrations add to the interest and usefulness of this book. Fine reproductions of many of his best illustrations and a complete list of his books are included.

     

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  • The Artist who Painted a Blue Horse, 2011

    The Artist who Painted a Blue Horse, 2011

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    Every child has an artist inside them, and this vibrant picture book from Eric Carle will help let it out. The artist in this book paints the world as he sees it, just like a child. There's a red crocodile, an orange elephant, a purple fox and a polka-dotted donkey. More than anything, there's imagination. Filled with some of the most magnificently colorful animals of Eric Carle's career, this new board book edition is a tribute to the creative life and celebrates the power of art.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Big Blue Spot, 2012

    The Big Blue Spot, 2012

    by Peter Holwitz Year Published: Easy Reading
    Follow the big blue spot as it drips and races its way through the pages of this fun, interactive book, eventually finding just the friend it has been searching for. Told in catchy rhyming verse, this simple yet clever story introduces children to the concept of combining colors to form new ones. Who knew spots could be so much fun?

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Dot, 2003

    The Dot, 2003

    by Peter H. Reynolds Year Published: Average
    Her teacher smiled. "Just make a mark and see where it takes you." Art class is over, but Vashti is sitting glued to her chair in front of a blank piece of paper. The words of her teacher are a gentle invitation to express herself. But Vashti can’t draw - she’s no artist. To prove her point, Vashti jabs at a blank sheet of paper to make an unremarkable and angry mark. "There!" she says. That one little dot marks the beginning of Vashti’s journey of surprise and self-discovery. That special moment is the core of Peter H. Reynolds’s delicate fable about the creative spirit in all of us.

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  • The Grouchy Ladybug, 1977

    The Grouchy Ladybug, 1977

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    A grouchy ladybug who is looking for a fight challenges everyone it meets regardless of their size or strength. How this bumptious bug gets its comeuppance and learns the pleasures to be gained by cheerfulness and good manners is an amusing lesson in social behavior. Die-cut pages add drama and dimension.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Mixed-Up Chameleon, 1975

    The Mixed-Up Chameleon, 1975

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    Hilarious pictures show what happens when a bored chameleon wishes it could be more like other animals, but is finally convinced it would rather just be itself. An imagination-stretcher for children.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Very Busy Spider, 1984

    The Very Busy Spider, 1984

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    With the use of raised printing, this innovative book adds the sense of touch to vision and hearing as ways to understand and enjoy the strikingly designed illustrations and the memorable story. Various farm animals try to divert a busy little spider from spinning her web, but she persists and produces a thing of both beauty and usefulness. Enjoyed by all audiences, this book’s tactile element makes it especially interesting to the visually-impaired.

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  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar

    by Eric Carle Year Published: Easy Reading
    This all-time favorite not only follows the very hungry caterpillar as it grows from egg to cocoon to beautiful butterfly, but also teaches the days of the week, counting, good nutrition and more. Striking pictures and cleverly die-cut pages offer interactive fun.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • What Do You Do With an Idea? 2011

    What Do You Do With an Idea? 2011

    by Kobi Yamada Year Published: Average
    This is the story of one brilliant idea and the child who helps to bring it into the world. As the child's confidence grows, so does the idea itself. And then, one day, something amazing happens. This is a story for anyone, at any age, who's ever had an idea that seemed a little too big, too odd, too difficult. It's a story to inspire you to welcome that idea, to give it some space to grow, and to see what happens next. Because your idea isn't going anywhere. In fact, it's just getting started.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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